E-Blasts

As promised, on July 17, 2017, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) released a revised version of the Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification.  Both the (English) and (Spanish) versions are located here for your Company’s use.  The new version makes only minor changes to the November 14, 2016 version of the form. The new version adds the Consular Report of Birth Abroad (Form FS-240) to List C, combines all the certifications of report of birth issued by the Department of State (Form FS-545, Form DS-1350 and Form FS-240) into selection C#2 in List C, and renumbers all List C documents except the Social Security card. Employers will be able to use the new, revised version or continue using the November 14, 2016 version through September 17th. However, starting September 18th, employers must begin using the revised form.  The USCIS also updated its handbook (here) which provides guidance on how to complete the new form.

Be on Watch for a New I-9 Form

United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) just announced that it will release a new Form I-9 on July 17th. Employers will be able to use the new, revised version or continue using the November 14, 2016 version through September 17th. However, starting September 18th, employers must begin using the new revised form. You can read USCIS’ statement about the upcoming release here.

COUNSEL TO MANAGEMENT:

Be on the lookout for an update from us early next week providing a copy of the new Form I-9 and detailing notable changes. If you have any questions about the Form I-9 or the I-9 process generally, please contact the experts at the Saqui Law Group.

The California Supreme Court‘s decision today in Williams v. Superior Court (“Williams”) is sure to excite opportunistic plaintiff attorneys, as it eliminates a potential – and completely reasonable - roadblock to their access of statewide discovery in Private Attorney General Act (PAGA)  actions.  In Williams, the Supreme Court held unequivocally that in PAGA cases plaintiffs are not required to show their claims have some basis in fact prior to seeking statewide discovery of employee contact information, even if the other employees hold vastly different jobs than the plaintiffs.

Effective immediately, all employers are required to provide employees upon new hire or upon request by other employees with a written notice about their rights to take protected time off for medical treatment or legal proceedings if they are a victim of domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking. Under AB 2337, the Labor Commissioner’s office was required to develop a form which set forth the rights and duties of employers and employees under the law for employers to provide to employees by July 1, 2017. Employers were not required to comply with this notice requirement until the Labor Commissioner’s office posted the form on its website. The Labor Commissioner’s office has now completed the form and made that form available (attached here), triggering employers’ requirement to comply with this new law.

As a follow up to yesterday’s eblast regarding an Employer’s immediate duty to provide written notice about an employee’s right to take protected time off for medical treatment or legal proceedings if they are a victim of domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking (here), the Labor Commissioner’s office released the Notice in Spanish. Both the English and Spanish versions are located here for your Company’s consideration and use.

No Single Payer Healthcare in California—Yet

By: Rebecca Hause-Schultz

Senate Bill 562, the “Healthy California Act” will not become law during this legislative session. The bill would have created a universal health care system in California and put in place a government run, $400 billion dollar single-payer plan. While the bill was quickly moving through the legislature, and was passed by the Senate in June, Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon has put the bill on hold. Rendon stated that there are “fatal flaws in the bill…including the fact that it does not address many serious issues, such as financing, delivery of care, cost controls, or the realities of needed action by the Trump administration and voters to make SB 562 a genuine piece of legislation.”

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